Sermons of 2019 at SsAM

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Sermons 2019

Here are links to all the recent recordings of sermons at the Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew and Matthew in downtown Wilmington, Delaware, the most recent first.

8/18/2019 – THE TENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr.

 

8/11/2019 – THE NINTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. Faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen. Faith often arises in the context of sorrow and loss. Go forth not knowing what awaits you, whether you will succeed or not, but going where God leads you. Do not expect to see the fruit of your labors, but let heaven rejoice. Do not be afraid. Be alert! God’s kingdom is at hand! Let your longing increase. Choose the better way.

 

8/4/2019 – THE EIGHTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. We are neither our bodies, our thoughts, nor our feelings. We are spiritual beings with physical, mental, and emotional experiences. By grace, we are rich toward God. By grace, we have more than enough. We do not need to store up possessions. We do not need to store up things, thoughts, or feelings, to try to hold on to them. Individually and as a church, we do not need to fret about finances, what we have or might not have, and whether what we have will be enough. By the grace of God, we have more than enough.

 

The Rev. Beverly Van Horne at the Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew and Matthew, Wilmington, Delaware7/28/2019 – THE SEVENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, sermon by the Rev. Beverly Van Horne. Jesus taught us to invite people right into our lives. Jesus taught us to invite God right into our lives. God always wants us to be in relationship to our neighbors and to the Spirit, to be hospitable, to be welcoming and loving. If we love, others will see God active in our lives, in our church. Hope, pray, and act! God is shaping us into a community of grace, a community of forgiveness, a community that is socially active, God’s will done on earth as in heaven.

 

The Rev Canon Martha Kirkpatrick7/21/2019 – THE SIXTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, sermon by the Rev. Canon Martha Kirkpatrick. Let us not be envious of others. If we are called to be hospitable, let us not envy those called to other roles, perhaps who sit meditating while we work making things ready. Let us catch ourselves in the act of envy before it sours our hospitality. Let us listen and watch ourselves to find how God is working in our lives, and in the lives of all those around us. Let us engage our imaginations. What might God be doing? What is Jesus saying to us? Let us be transformed, both as individuals and as a community.

 

The Rev. Beverly Van Horne at the Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew and Matthew, Wilmington, Delaware7/14/2019 – THE FIFTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, sermon by the Rev. Beverly Van Horn. Our common humanity calls us to give aid to those in need if it is in our power to do so. We pray to God for merciful hearts. We pray that we might be compassionate. Those who follow Jesus care for their neighbors, all of them. Let the Holy Spirit show us the way.

 

7/7/2019 – THE FORTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, sermon by the Rev. Edward E. Godden. We, the baptized, are missionaries. At our best, we take the kingdom of God, so near to us, to others, to offer a cure to the world’s ills, relying not on ourselves but on the Spirit. God’s Spirit leads us to every town and place, to every race and nation. We, God’s children, go together, encouraging one another, motivated by love. At our best, by grace, we have it abundantly, love for God and for our neighbor. Where love is, there is God.

 

THE THIRD SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews. What has to die in us in order that we might proclaim the good news of Jesus Christ, that we might be free? The denial of death is the denial of God. With grace, we can die to ourselves so that our selfishness no longer rules us. A new freedom emerges. We are revived when we give up what separates us from God, when we give up what controls us. Let us seek to take our place in God’s redemption, thriving in God’s love, dying to self.

 

The Rev. Beverly Van Horne at the Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew and Matthew, Wilmington, DelawareTHE SECOND SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, sermon by the Rev. Beverly Van Horn. We are called to be faithful, not comfortable. Even so, another name for the Holy Spirit is “The Comforter”. The Holy Spirit transforms us. We are now children of God, family, in spite of our failings. As children, we follow a person. God no longer expects his followers to obey religious laws to obtain purity but to follow his voice to find redemption. God cares infinitely more about our hopes for the future than he does about our past mistakes.

 

THE FIRST SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST – Trinity Sunday, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews. You do not have to believe much to be an Episcopalian, just what Christians have believed for centuries. Suffering is redeemed. It gives us endurance, character, and hope. We use our holy imaginations. We ask what is possible. We are all evangelists. We proclaim by word and example the Good News of God in Christ. We study. We pray. We worship. We praise. We love God and one another.

 

THE DAY OF PENTECOST – WHITSUNDAY, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews. Our world views color our perceptions, making us question our access to the truth. Is it any wonder then that people, when they hear us talk about our faith, think we might be a bit drunk in a way? That our world view has made us see things that really are not there? That is what people thought about the disciples of Jesus when the Holy Spirit descended on them and got them praising God. Let us, like the disciples, praise God, even to those whose world views do not allow for such things, and let us do our best to understand the world views of others, not just to broaden our own world view, but so the Good News might be declared in new ways.

 

THE SEVENTH SUNDAY OF EASTER, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews. In jail, sing hymns and praises to God. It is easy if you are filled with the Holy Spirit. Like the jailer of Paul and Silas, invite God into your heart. Be saved! Become a servant of the Most High and so become liberated from disbelief. Salvation is not about getting to heaven. Salvation is about here and now, secure in the midst of the earthquake, flood, and fire. Do what you must do to be saved. Walk as a child of the light.

 

THE SIXTH SUNDAY OF EASTER, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews. The work of faith is an inside job. The details of our days call for our immediate attention and we forget that we have a companion. Instead, we react to the demands of the moment. Rest, prayer, reading, and study elude us. Where is God? Everywhere and at all times! Look for God in your daily tasks, if you can remember to do so, if you can remember to invite God into the task at hand. The Holy Spirit is there and willing, comfort close at hand.

 

THE FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews. Our timelines spiral upwards and downwards. This is true for each of us individually and for the communities to which we belong: our church, our city, our state, our country. Three forces motivate us: affirmation, denial, and reconciliation. Who are we to hinder God? As Cynthia Bourgneault says, “inescapably revealed through this weaving [of affirming, denying, and reconciling], is the Kingdom of Heaven, visibly manifest in the very midst of all the human cruelty and brokenness.”

 

THE FOURTH SUNDAY OF EASTER, sermon by the Rev. Canon Lloyd S. Casson. We, the sheep of God, recognize our shepherd’s voice and follow. We shall not want. We shall fear no evil, even through the valley of death. We shall dwell in the house of the Lord forever. He leads us to springs of living water. The glory of the Lord surrounds us. We are they who are loved. We are named. No one can snatch us away. We are given life and have it abundantly.

 

THE THIRD SUNDAY OF EASTER, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews. Watch as the waves come to the shore. Wade into the water. Follow Jesus, the risen one. Seek and you shall find. Do not let your nakedness and shame stop you. God calls us, the imperfect, to follow and be redeemed. Cast your net and pull in the catch. Eat and be satisfied.

 

THE SECOND SUNDAY OF EASTER, sermon by the Rev. Emily Gibson. We doubt the news we find on social media, radio, and TV. Too often those producing it simply want to inflame our passions. The apostle Thomas doubted the news of Jesus’s resurrection. Doubt is part of faith. We are to seek the truth, not accept that everything we hear is true. Here is the truth: Be ready to give up your life so you may find it. Pick up your cross and follow where faith leads. We belong to something larger than ourselves.

 

THE SUNDAY OF THE RESURRECTION – EASTER DAY, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews. We are the sheep of your own fold, lambs of your own flock, sinners of your own redeeming. First was Mary Magdelene to see you risen from the dead. We, too, have seen you — in the work of the Spirit that infuses our minds, bodies, and sould. We see you in our families, friends, and neighbors. We see you in all of creation! We who were dead now live. We who were disappointed now are glad!

 

THE SUNDAY OF THE PASSION – PALM SUNDAY, homily by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. Martin Buber’s story, The Angel and the World’s Dominion, tells of restless souls with little understanding; confused speechlessness; of a heaven that grows bright, shining, merciful, and abundant; too deep, too dreadful. Let us join in the great work of the two processions of Palm Sunday and Good Friday; celebration and suffering pain. Look inward and look to God.

 

FIFTH SUNDAY IN LENT, sermon by the Rev. Canon Lloyd S. Casson. Our spirits experience full times and times of want, times of work and times of rest, times of longing and times of joy, times when we understand and times we are dumbfounded. At all times, love is poured forth lavishly upon us, upon the world and upon our lives. Let us find and embrace that love.

 

FOURTH SUNDAY IN LENT, sermon by the Rev. Emily Gibson. We are new creations in Christ. By grace, we do not hold ourselves higher than those around us. Redeemed, we count ourselves blessed, not better. Thank God and ask God. Picture the parable of the prodigal son. Imagine yourself as that wastrel. Imagine yourself also as the older son, who always did right. Then picture yourself as the father, who loves both his sons. Reflect on what you pictured.

 

THIRD SUNDAY IN LENT, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. Bear fruit. Rest. Welcome others and let others welcome you. Worship. Pray. Read. Walk. Meditate. Let your reading of scriptures raise questions for you, challenge you. Recognize the patterns of sin, broken promises, lament, reconciliation, love, loss, incarnation, resistance, passion, crucifixion, resurrection, and salvation in the daily news and in your life. Connect to the living Christ. Live into love.

 

SECOND SUNDAY IN LENT, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. Dear God, let us not be silent. Let us, the citizens of heaven, testify that body and spirit are one, different as they are. Let us, the friends of the cross, endure our suffering by grace, and look for redemption, our bodies and souls resurrected, restored and whole. We, the citizens of heaven, have been formed in baptism. Let us write a new story. Let us accept the strength God offers our faith into practice.

 

March 10, 2019 sermon by the Rev. David AndrewsFIRST SUNDAY IN LENT, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. Lent is a time for simplicity, for cutting back to the essentials. We make time in our lives to study the Bible. We set aside time to pray. We humbly acknowledge our weakness. We rely more strongly on God to deliver us. We bind ourselves closer to our constant companion, the Holy Spirit. We endure temptation. Our restless souls are calm.

 

LAST SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY – CARNIVAL SUNDAY, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. After talking with God, the face of Moses glowed, frightening the Israelites so much that Moses started wearing a veil, so as not to alarm them. Inspired by the Holy Spirit, we shine. We are not to hide our love of God. Let us dare to remove our masks and veils, even if the sight of us alarms people. We will not escape persecution and suffering if we glimmer instead of shine, if we murmur instead of sing. Let us set aside our fears. Are we not God’s own?

 

Link to a video of Fr. David’s first Sunday at SsAM in 2010.

SEVENTH SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY, sermon by the Rev. Emily Gibson. Yes, we live in a world of wounds, a wounded world, but God is with us. Let us embrace the lives we have been given. Let us trust in God’s goodness. We can be instruments of peace and healing. We can be healed. Let us search our souls. Let us live extravagantly! Let us seek peace, union, faith, hope, light, joy, understanding, and forgiveness.

 

SIXTH SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. You are challenged to answer two questions. (1) What are the major pressures, demands, and expectations in your life? (2) How does your practice of Christian faith help or hinder you in maintaining your equilibrium in the face of these expectations, demands, and pressures in your emotional and physical renewal, and in your spiritual renewal? Try to answer these in the coming week, especially looking for ways in which your time at church can be more refreshing.

 

FIFTH SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. Experience has prepared us to accompany others in their moments of sorrow. Grief needs company and empathy, especially from those with experience. Good, beauty, truth — let us look for these. Let us turn toward the light and, if we can, if it is within our means, let us point others toward the light, not forgetting to let them point us toward the light. It is, after all, a matter of moving together.

 

FOURTH SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. Let us treat others as fellow subjects, not as inert objects; as partners, not obstacles; people worthy of our love, not things to disdain. Let us make our home in God’s love. We are not trinkets in God’s collection, nor exhibits in God’s zoo, but sisters and brothers in God’s family. We eat and drink the bread and wine. We receive the gift of Christ. Here we are, Lord, send us forth!

 

THIRD SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY, sermon by the Rev. Emily Gibson. The earth is the Lord’s, and all that is in it. We humans are not separate from God’s creatures but share a planet with them. As Thomas Berry said, the universe is a communion, not a collection, a communion remembered in the ritual we celebrate every Sunday here at SsAM. Each of us has a part to play but we are one in Christ. Let us renew our commitment. Let us stop, look, and listen.

 

SECOND SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. The work of freedom goes on, so that each of us may have equal justice under the law and, more than that, so we treat each other fairly, even lovingly. We cannot turn back. We cannot be satisfied with progress and not success. We have a dream. Let us live and act to make that dream real.

 

Andrews sermon 2019-01-13FIRST SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. Our God lives! If you listen to the words said every Sunday, even though many of those words are the same as previous Sundays, you will hear something new. Listen with curiosity. Listen in wonder, questioning the meaning of what you hear. What stands out? What is God trying to tell you? Listen and you will be refreshed!

 

THE EPIPHANY, sermon by the Rev. David T. Andrews, Jr. Attending a worship service at SsAM is like joining a caravan. People join together and make their way to an oasis of refreshing spiritual waters. We say prayers together. We listen to ancient readings and a contemporary sermon. We confess our sins and pray for the world. Then, having shared the bread and wine of communion, we move on, rejuvenated. Thanks be to God!

 

Click here to see the complete archive of recorded sermons at SsAM.